Jan Ohlberger, PhD

​

Research Scientist, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

​

My research is motivated by the desire to understand how organisms interact with each other and the biotic environment, and how aquatic ecosystems are affected by human activity. Specifically, I study how fish populations in marine and freshwater ecosystems respond to climate change, fishing, and diseases. I am interested in the ecological, physiological, and evolutionary aspects of these responses. To investigate my research questions, I use numerical models such as age- or size-structured population models in combination with empirical data, statistical models, time-series analysis, simulation modeling, lab experiments and fieldwork.  

​

Keywords: climate change, conservation, fisheries, life-history, metabolic scaling, population dynamics, size-structure, species interactions, thermal adaptation

Recent publications

​

Cline et al. 2019. Effects of warming climate and competition in the ocean for life-histories of Pacific salmon. Nature Ecology & Evolution.

​

Lindmark et al. 2019. Sizebased ecological interactions drive food web responses to climate warming. Ecology Letters.

​

DeFilippo et al. 2019. Recruitment variation disrupts the stability of alternative life histories in an exploited salmon population. Evolutionary Applications.

​

Ohlberger et al. 2018. Demographic changes in Chinook salmon across the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Fish and Fisheries.